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Jose Morris
Jose Morris

Learn from the Expert: Mechanics of Aircraft Structures Second Edition by C. T. Sun, a Renowned Professor and Researcher


Mechanics Of Aircraft Structures Second Edition C T Sun Solution Manual




If you are looking for a comprehensive textbook that covers the fundamentals of structural mechanics and aerospace engineering with an emphasis on new materials and recent advances, then you might want to check out Mechanics Of Aircraft Structures Second Edition by C. T. Sun. This book is designed to help students get a solid background in structural mechanics as well as to help professionals keep up to date on recent developments in the field. In this article, we will give you an overview of what this book is about, who is the author, what are the main features and updates of the second edition, and how you can use it to learn or review the topics covered in each chapter. We will also provide some example problems and solutions from each chapter to give you a taste of what you can expect from this book.




Mechanics Of Aircraft Structures Second Edition C T Sun Solution Manual



Introduction




Mechanics Of Aircraft Structures Second Edition is a textbook that covers the basic theory and analysis methods of structural mechanics with applications to aircraft structures. It also introduces the mechanics of composite materials and laminated structures, which are increasingly used in modern aircraft design. The book is divided into eight chapters, each with its own objectives, key concepts, terms, examples, problems, and solutions. The book also includes appendices that provide useful formulas and tables for reference.


The author of this book is C. T. Sun, who is the Neil A. Armstrong Distinguished Professor in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. He is also the recipient of the 2004 Purdue University Research Award. He has over 40 years of experience in teaching and research in the areas of structural mechanics, composite materials, fracture mechanics, and nanomechanics. He has published over 300 journal papers and 10 books on these topics. He is also a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Society for Composites (ASC), and the American Academy of Mechanics (AAM).


The second edition of this book was published in 2006 by John Wiley & Sons. It has been extensively updated and expanded to reflect the latest developments and advances in the field of structural mechanics and aerospace engineering. Some of the new features and updates of the second edition are:



  • A new chapter on fracture mechanics that introduces the basic concepts and tools for studying crack growth and damage tolerance in aircraft structures.



  • A new section on analysis of composite laminates that covers the stiffness and compliance matrices, failure criteria, and delamination effects.



  • More examples and problems that illustrate the applications of the theory and methods to realistic aircraft structures.



  • More details and explanations on some of the derivations and solutions to enhance the clarity and understanding of the material.



  • More references and suggestions for further reading or practice at the end of each chapter.



Chapter 1: Characteristics of Aircraft Structures and Materials




The first chapter of this book provides an introduction to the characteristics of aircraft structures and materials. It covers the following topics:



  • The types and functions of aircraft structures, such as wings, fuselage, tail, landing gear, etc.



  • The types and sources of loads acting on aircraft structures, such as aerodynamic loads, inertial loads, thermal loads, etc.



  • The concepts and definitions of stress, strain, stiffness, strength, and failure modes in structural mechanics.



  • The properties and classifications of materials used in aircraft structures, such as metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, etc.



Some of the key concepts and terms introduced in this chapter are:



  • Aircraft structures: The components or parts that support or transmit loads in an aircraft.



  • Loads: The forces or moments that act on a structure or a material.



  • Stress: The intensity or distribution of internal forces in a material or a cross-section.



  • Strain: The measure or degree of deformation or change in shape or size of a material or a structure due to external loads.



  • Stiffness: The resistance or ability of a material or a structure to deform under external loads.



  • Strength: The maximum stress or load that a material or a structure can withstand without failure.



  • Failure modes: The ways or mechanisms by which a material or a structure fails under external loads, such as yielding, fracture, buckling, fatigue, creep, etc.



  • Materials: The substances or matter that make up a structure or a component.



Here are some example problems and solutions from this chapter:


Example 1.1




A thin-walled cylindrical pressure vessel with an inner radius of 0.5 m and a wall thickness of 10 mm is subjected to an internal pressure of 2 MPa. Determine the hoop stress and the longitudinal stress in the wall.


Solution




The hoop stress $\sigma_h$ is given by:


$$\sigma_h = \fracprt$$ where $p$ is the internal pressure, $r$ is the inner radius, and $t$ is the wall thickness. Substituting the given values, we get:


$$\sigma_h = \frac(2\times10^6)(0.5)0.01 = 100\times10^6 \text Pa = 100 \text MPa$$ The longitudinal stress $\sigma_l$ is given by: $$\sigma_l = \fracpr2t$$ where $p$ is the internal pressure, $r$ is the inner radius, and $t$ is the wall thickness. Substituting the given values, we get: $$\sigma_l = \frac(2\times10^6)(0.5)2(0.01) = 50\times10^6 \text Pa = 50 \text MPa$$ The longitudinal stress is usually less than the hoop stress in a thin-walled cylindrical pressure vessel. This is because the internal pressure acts on the ends of the cylinder and stretches the length of the cylinder, as shown in Figure 1.


Figure 1: Longitudinal stress in a thin-walled cylindrical pressure vessel


Example 1.2




A thin-walled spherical pressure vessel with an inner radius of 0.4 m and a wall thickness of 5 mm is subjected to an internal pressure of 1.5 MPa. Determine the tangential stress and the radial stress in the wall.


Solution




The tangential stress $\sigma_t$ is given by:


$$\sigma_t = \fracprt$$ where $p$ is the internal pressure, $r$ is the inner radius, and $t$ is the wall thickness. Substituting the given values, we get:


$$\sigma_t = \frac(1.5\times10^6)(0.4)0.005 = 120\times10^6 \text Pa = 120 \text MPa$$ The tangential stress accounts for the stress in the plane of the surface of the sphere. The stress normal to the walls of the sphere is called the radial stress, $\sigma_r$. The radial stress is zero on the outer wall since that is a free surface. On the inner wall, the normal stress is $\sigma_r = -p$, as shown in Figure 2. Since $t/r \ll 1$, $p \ll \sigma_t$, and it is reasonable to take $\sigma_r = 0$ not only on the outer wall, but on the inner wall also. The stress state in the spherical wall is then one of plane stress.



Figure 2: Radial stress in a thin-walled spherical pressure vessel


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